camera detectors

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sschrammel
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camera detectors

Post by sschrammel » 14 May 2017, 23:14

I've had success photographing americium in atomlight liquid scintillator with a 6400 iso camera. I didn't even remove the uv filter.
Here's what I'd like to know. If I use a 400,000 iso camera with the uv filter removed would I be able to detect the much lower energy
of tritium. A camera like this is 60 times more sensitive. Americium at 59k compared to tritium at 8k.

stamasd
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Re: camera detectors

Post by stamasd » 30 Oct 2017, 15:12

I assume that by "uv filter" you actually mean the hot mirror filter which is in fact an IR not an UV filter - though it will stop some UV too. Or did you mean the actual UV filter that you screw over the lens?
Anyway that should be interesting. You should know that the glass of the lenses absorbs a great deal of UV. Some lenses are better than others at letting UV through. There's quite a bit of information online about which lenses are more suitable than others for UV and IR photoghaphy.
Also the brand of the camera matters because sensors from different manufacturers have different spectral responses. As a rule of thumb, Canon cameras are better for IR and Nikon are better for UV though I think that for recent models the difference isn't that significant anymore, especially for IR.
I do have a modified Canon camera with the hot filter removed and I've done quite a bit of IR photography with it. I use an old Canon EF 28-105 f/3.5 USM I with it which is decent at IR transmission. I never got much into UV photography though photographing radioactive sources in a liquid scintillator seems an interesting project. Please share pictures!
Real name: Silviu Tamasdan

sschrammel
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Re: camera detectors

Post by sschrammel » 01 Nov 2017, 12:57

There is uv filtering in digital cameras. Its an easy topic to explore. The bigger issue is whether the deleterious effects on human fertility caused by tritium should even be explored. This is, to my mind the single largest philosophical quandary humankind ever faced. On the one hand , the earth has already entered natural " organic" overcapacity, but on the other, we'd all like to see our properties appreciate. ie supply and demand. I wish I had the resources to explore this but just drilling a well to reach a confined aquifer has tapped me out

Cheers

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Geoff
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Re: camera detectors

Post by Geoff » 01 Nov 2017, 14:46

Would you mind sharing the americium scintillation pictures?
Geoff Van Horn

Anchorage and Deadhorse Alaska

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