Hi from northern Germany

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DanaRansby
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Hi from northern Germany

Post by DanaRansby » 13 Sep 2020, 00:00

Hi, I am Dana Ransby and live in northern Germany. I was once involved in radiation measurements professionally as a research scientist in an environmental radioactivity lab. I analyzed all kind of natural and artificial isotopes in environmental media, including water, soil, sediment, plants, food, ... and a couple of more exotic samples, which are always the best. My background is geoscience and environmental physics. For my research I learnt radiochemical techniques of uranium, thorium and plutonium separation for alpha spectrometry and mass spectrometry, but still my main expertise is low level gamma spectrometry with HPGe systems. During my studies I employed portable scintillation detectors for environmental surveys. I was made aware of this community by another north-German contributor and thought I might join discussions. Looking forward to that!
Dana
https://orcid.org/0000-0002-3643-333X
https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Da ... e_Pittauer

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Sesselmann
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Re: Hi from northern Germany

Post by Sesselmann » 13 Sep 2020, 09:13

Hello Dana,

Welcome to the forum.

It looks like you have valuable experience to contribute, so I look forward to reading your posts.

Well done on making it through our anti spambot registration system :)

Steven

keuleeule
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Re: Hi from northern Germany

Post by keuleeule » 13 Sep 2020, 09:16

That sounds very interesting Dana, a member of AWI,
It was always my dream to take the Polarstern and go to Arctic and Antarctic. May be you did that already... or you start in Kiel with the smaller one.
Welcome and let us share knowledge. I was born in Kiel, maybe that's why I had these dreams once.
Kolja

keuleeule
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Re: Hi from northern Germany

Post by keuleeule » 13 Sep 2020, 09:21

Btw, are you searching for natural radioisotope in the sediment or manmade from atomic history, or as well searching for pollution from sunken nuke reactor , waste, or as well accidents like Daiichi & Chernobyl?

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GigaBecquerel
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Re: Hi from northern Germany

Post by GigaBecquerel » 13 Sep 2020, 16:57

Welcome!

It's nice to see more germans here!
I have not seen any radiochemistry on here yet, it would be great if you could present some :-)

Lukas

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Svilen
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Re: Hi from northern Germany

Post by Svilen » 13 Sep 2020, 18:32

Oh, great to see you here Dana!

I directly leave this thread here for you to update and improve ;)
For now, there is just the preliminary analysis from Bill there:
https://www.gammaspectacular.com/phpBB3 ... 5&start=10
Svilen

DanaRansby
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Re: Hi from northern Germany

Post by DanaRansby » 18 Sep 2020, 00:42

Thanks everyone for your friendly welcome!

@Kolja: I've only been on a sea-going expedition once so far (with Maria S Merian, in Amazon region). Maybe there will be an opportunity again, but currently I'm desk-bound:) Within the last months we've been receiving data from the 1-year long Arctic drift experiment with Polarstern, and I'm taking care of publishing these data in cooperation with the researchers.
To answer your next question: (almost) all of the above. I applied natural radioisotopes in the sediment cores for determining the age of individual layers. Man-made radionuclides can be also used for that as an additional tool. But I mainly used the isotopic signals of the artificial isotopes for determining their origin (certain nuclear test sites, global fallout, SNAP-9 fallout (have you heard of that?), reprocessing, Chernobyl, ...) and migration patterns in the ocean. Didn't do anything with sunken submarines yet though.

@Lukas: Thanks. Yeah, maybe I can do that. I don't consider myself a "real" radiochemistry expert. I was lucky to find a mentor, whom I visited for a couple of weeks and he helped me understand and apply some robust (fool-proof) methods for my type of samples. I could implement those back in our lab. But lab work is the best, I miss it so much.

@Svilen: Cool, will process the Maralingite spectra soon ;)

Dana

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iRad
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Re: Hi from northern Germany

Post by iRad » 18 Sep 2020, 07:05

Aw SNAP... "In 1964, a U.S. Navy Transit navigation satellite failed to reach orbit and disintegrated in the atmosphere. The satellite received its electrical power from a 4.5 pound, grapefruit-sized radiothermal generator (RTG) that produced energy from the heat of its decaying radioisotopes. The device, known as a SNAP or System for Nuclear Auxiliary Power, disintegrated, scattering plutonium particles in the atmosphere over the southern hemisphere."

"In 1961, the first RTG used in a space mission was launched aboard a U.S. Navy transit navigation satellite. The electrical power output of this RTG, which was called Space Nuclear Auxiliary Power (SNAP-3), was a mere 2.7 watts. But the important story was that it continued to perform for 15 years after launch.

Since that initial SNAP-3 mission, RTGs have been an indispensable part of America's space program. They have been involved in more than 25 missions, orbiting Earth and traveling to planets and their moons both nearby and in deep space. (Astronauts on five Apollo missions left RTG units on the lunar surface to power the Apollo Lunar Surface Experiment Packages.)"

On the use of plutonium RTGs, the DoE says the following: "Although other radioactive fuels have been considered for RTGs, plutonium-238 (Pu-238) has been used most widely. Pu-238 is a radioactive isotope - a form of plutonium that gives off energy as rays and particles. It continues to be the radioactive fuel of choice today and in planned future missions. ... Longer space missions require a radioisotope with a longer half-life. Pu-238, with its half-life of 87.7 years, fills the need. For example, after five years, approximately 96 percent of the original heat output of Pu-238 is still available. ... Because the nuclear fuel in RTGs is radioactive, safety is a critical issue. ... LOL
Cheers, Tom Hall / IRAD INC / Stuart, FL USA
Please check out my eBay Store: http://stores.ebay.com/The-Rad-Lab

DanaRansby
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Re: Hi from northern Germany

Post by DanaRansby » 18 Sep 2020, 16:19

Exactly. The fallout from this atmospheric burn-up was more prominent over the southern hemisphere, therefore also the traces of plutonium in the Pacific ocean water bodies have slightly different isotopic signals. So much the theory. I was looking into the ocean sediments in several west equatorial Pacific marginal sea sites and the difference in 238Pu/239+240Pu ratio was there, however I was hoping for being able to quantify contributions of northern versus southern Pacific ocean transport recorded in the sediments over several decades and that was really tricky, with all the experimental uncertainties.

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iRad
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Re: Hi from northern Germany

Post by iRad » 18 Sep 2020, 21:57

We're very glad your here Dana!
Last edited by iRad on 19 Sep 2020, 03:37, edited 1 time in total.
Cheers, Tom Hall / IRAD INC / Stuart, FL USA
Please check out my eBay Store: http://stores.ebay.com/The-Rad-Lab

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