FICS Fusion Experiment

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Steven Sesselmann
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Re: FICS Fusion Experiment

Post by Steven Sesselmann » 11 May 2017, 11:08

Boris,

Thanks for your feedback, I happen to be working on a solution very similar to what you have suggested for the flux capacitor. I could use transformer oil, as I have 2 25 ltr. drums on hand, but to make it less messy I have ordered a kg of Sylgard (two part silicone), this is the stuff they use to glue PV cells to glass.

Not sure if I understood your HV wiring suggestion, because we are confining the positive deuterons, not the electrons.

This experiment sets out to test two of my hypothesis 's he first one is to test if the kinetic energy of the secondary fusion ash can be converted into DC current, and the second one is to demonstrate that nuclear fusion is NOT induced by colliding two deuterons together at high energies relative to each other, but rather the exact opposite, namely that fusion between two deuterons takes place when two deuterons have the same four momentum.

We can manipulate the four momentum of a nucleus by ionising the atom at a specific potential, thereby creating deuterons with similar four momentum. This is why the flux capacitor is important, because it allows me to lower the potential of the deuterium gas before it gets ionised.

According to my theory (https://www.researchgate.net/publicatio ... _Potential) the optimum ionisation energy for a deuteron is in the order of -62 kV which is perfectly achievable, however the heat produced by the fusion reaction itself tends to change the four momentum of the other ions which self extinguishes the fusion rate, this is why the Sun doesn't explode. But by overcompensating i.e. lowering the voltage a bit more and extracting the heat we can keep the reaction going.

Maintaining the reaction only requires a few milli Amps, so it is plausible for a larger version of FICS to generate enough charge separation to maintain a self sustained reaction.


fc.jpg
Flux Capacitor (Third attempt)
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Boris
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Re: FICS Fusion Experiment

Post by Boris » 12 May 2017, 08:02

Steven,
The silicone is a very nice clean solution!
If i understand the fusion from you explanation: deuterons should reach -62 Kev, and fuse not by collision, but because they are in the same state and preferably in almost the same place.
the four-momentum is a bit (way) to complex form me, I can imaginative see the two deuterons having the same spinvertor, and place in time and space & charge, drawn to each other by probably lorentz effects.


It sounds like creating the "perfect" condition to join the two deuterons because combined as in 2N2P they cannot exist, so energy and a neutron are released, resulting in 3He.
Based on the big amount of energy released in the fusion, the theory is that the energy used to create the perfect conditions is lower than the energy released by the fusion. however I cannot understand how the released energy would induce the next fusion, it would help to keep to stay in the plasma state.

I did read your theory, hence I can only understand what I can see in my mind, I lost you somewhere in the mathematical formulas.
but I can understand in general that you are theorizing.

It feels like something is missing in the puzzle, and form me now it feels like time is energy just like mass is energy.
so this could connect to the potential that is dropping to propel time...and it would be no surprise if part of the fusion related energy have its effects on time because no matter can be at the same place and time, something has to shift.

I´m probably way off the track but this is fascinating...

Regards, Boris.

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Steven Sesselmann
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Re: FICS Fusion Experiment

Post by Steven Sesselmann » 12 May 2017, 11:10

Boris,

Of course it is entirely possible that my speculations are wrong, but to me the electrons and protons represent the ying and yang of the world, and the electrical potential existing between them is proportional to absolute time. Strangely the electrical potential has little to do with the actual proton or electron, and all to do with the observer. This idea might sound a bit crazy, but it takes the "crazy" out of quantum mechanics, which has to be a good thing.

We already accept absolute velocity and when we realise how absolute velocity is a function of absolute potential we understand that relative movement is simply a function of potential, so if we want two deuterons to fuse we should preferably have them moving at the same speed and direction as the observer (remember we are all moving).

By knowing ground potential we can now work out the velocity (relative speed) of an ionised particle as long as we know at which potential it was ionised. The equation is trivially simple.

[processing LaTex...]

Where ∆v is relative velocity with respect to the observer, c is speed of light, ∆V is the difference in potential (Volts) and Ø is absolute potential.

So if you dislodge an electron from a deuterium atom at ground potential, the nucleus will instantly assume a velocity of around 2500 km/s, you can think of this in the same context as thermal velocity. Air molecules move fast, but charged nuclei move ridiculously fast (all because of ∆V).

Now take a deuterium gas down to -62,000 volts before removing the electrons and you discover how ∆V is small and consequently ∆v is small, so now you and the ionised deuterium nuclei are at similar potential, and the fusion can easily take place.

Once again we can think of fusion like docking a shuttle at the international space station, the station and the shuttle need to move at the same speed, otherwise it won't work.

Steven
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Re: FICS Fusion Experiment

Post by Boris » 13 May 2017, 02:07

Thanks Steven, I'm starting to get it.

Still wonder how the particles find each other, because in the atomic scale the the particles are miles apart in the flux capacitor.
But if many particles are present some will fuse I guess.

Cheers, Boris.

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Re: FICS Fusion Experiment

Post by Steven Sesselmann » 13 May 2017, 10:21

Boris wrote: Still wonder how the particles find each other, because in the atomic scale the the particles are miles apart in the flux capacitor.
But if many particles are present some will fuse I guess.
You are absolutely right and this is why fusion is such a problem, not only do we need to get the particles moving in the same direction but we also need to confine them. I think this is why the Tokamak is showing some promise, because instead of making particles stand still they at least get them all going in the same direction.

In my FICS reactor the ions created at low potential are confined to the hollow cathode as they don't have the energy to climb out, so in principle at least the pressure (density) of ions should build up inside the cathode.

In reality ions are swapping electrons all the time so neutrals can and will escape.

The way I see it, the efficiency of the hollow cathode FICS design should scale favourably with size, because the volume to surface area of the sphere improves with increasing radius, so mu current experiment has a 6" diameter chamber.
ratio.png
Surface to Volume ratio
Only experiment will show if it works, so now I am just waiting for the silicone to arrive so I can run it and see what else is going to break :)

Steven
Steven Sesselmann | Sydney | Australia | gammaspectacular.com | groundpotential.org | beejewel.com.au |

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Steven Sesselmann
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Re: FICS Fusion Experiment

Post by Steven Sesselmann » 31 Oct 2017, 21:07

After running the FICS reactor for many hours with mixed results, I decided to crack it open.

It was generating neutrons but the TIER was in the low high 10^4 low 10^5 range, and it should have been doing a lot more than this. I suspect the 6" cathode chamber was too large and that too many ions failed to circulate through the chamber, making it near impossible to keep the plasma lit. Hindsight is much brighter than foresight :)

On a positive note, this chamber held vacuum really well, it would only drop by around 20 microns a day, which is pretty impressive when you consider how many layers and seals it has. Also surprising how I was able to separate the cathode from the glass disc with relative ease. Just a few squirts of acetone and a gentle lever action made the latex glue come apart.

Plan B
I have already started making a new cathode, this one will only be 30 mm thick, and will incorporate a neodymium ring magnet in the centre. The two accelerator tubes will almost come together face to face, allowing for easy ion transition through the hole. the actual cathode will not have any metal protruding into the chamber, thereby making it impossible for ions to strike the cathode directly and release secondaries.
Top2.jpg
Top accelerator chamber

Inside1.jpg
View inside chamber
nozzle.JPG
Nozzle close up
Steven Sesselmann | Sydney | Australia | gammaspectacular.com | groundpotential.org | beejewel.com.au |

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