I gave up a lifetime supply of neutrons.

Hang up the labcoat, relax and chat about anything
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Geoff
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I gave up a lifetime supply of neutrons.

Post by Geoff » 18 Jun 2015, 16:35

In a mix of sadness and excitement I resigned from my position as Lead Technician, Mechanical Tech level 3, Radiation Safety Officer and Radiation Maintenance Specialist level 2.

From here I will be pursuing a Bachelor of Science in Geological Sciences degree from the University of Alaska, Anchorage. I am excited to start down the path to something I am truly passionate about. In all honesty, I’ll probably end up back in the oilfield upon completion of my degree.

My last day is the 24th. As such, I've taken to bending some rules and using a particle accelerator to activate random items. You can look forward to a great many odd spectra in the near future. Including W185 and 187, Zn65, Cu66 and maybe 64. Possibly Be10. Who knows what else. I have about a week before I have to make an RaBe neutron source if I want to activate stuff. Oh! I also irradiated a sizable chunk of uranpyrochlore for nearly 12 hours. Really excited to see what comes of it.
Geoff Van Horn

Anchorage and Deadhorse Alaska

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Steven Sesselmann
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Re: I gave up a lifetime supply of neutrons.

Post by Steven Sesselmann » 18 Jun 2015, 21:06

Geoff,

I commend you on your decision to give up what I imagine is a well paid job, to pursue a science degree. It must have been a tough decision, but following your dream is always the right one. Best of luck and let us know how you go.
Steven Sesselmann | Sydney | Australia | gammaspectacular.com | groundpotential.org | rephopper.com | beejewel.com.au |

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Steve Dubyk
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Re: I gave up a lifetime supply of neutrons.

Post by Steve Dubyk » 21 Jun 2015, 08:13

Geoff, that is truly a big decision, but I suspect you will enjoy your path forward. I have never regretted getting my degree in geology, even though at this point in my career I don't use it on the job much. I work and hike with other geologists, and our weekend fieldwork has been a real blast, introducing us to areas that we have selected for mineral collecting, and areas that not a whole lot of folks get to visit.

If you don't have it already, I would recommend getting the latest version of Roadside Geology of Alaska; I have the '86 version and have read it a couple of times. One thing I know you will enjoy are the field trips, going out to where the rocks live! Good luck with your endeavor!

Steve Dubyk

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